Language Vocabulary Skill Mini-lessons Language/Vocabulary Skill Mini-lessons

Grade 1

The vocabulary/language mini-lessons support students and teachers with vocabulary knowledge and skills. The mini-lessons are written for specific texts, which teachers need to access for instruction. Teachers can also adapt them to other texts or even other grades. The mini-lessons cover language standards L.4 and L.5, which are the standards with greatest focus on vocabulary as it applies to reading.

LV Grade 1 Language Standard

 
LANGUAGE STANDARDASSOCIATED WHEATLEY TEXTSASSOCIATED WHEATLEY READING LESSONS
M1M2M3M4M5
L.1.4Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
L.1.4.AUse sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

A Weed Is a Flower

2

Storms

3

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

6

 

 


4

L.1.4.BUse frequently occurring affixes as a clue to the meaning of a word.

Me… Jane

3
L.1.4.CIdentify frequently occurring root words (e.g., look) and their inflectional forms (e.g., looks, looked, looking).

The Korean Cinderella

15
L.1.5With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
L.1.5.ASort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.
L.1.5.BDefine words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is a large cat with stripes).

What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?

19
L.1.5.CIdentify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy).

What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?

21

Storms

2

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

29
L.1.5.DDistinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings.

Never Smile at a Monkey

27

Testing the Ice: A True Story About Jackie Robinson

16

Cinderella

 


Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters

2


 


18

GRADE 1: MODULE 2

GRADE 1: MODULE 2

 
Me… Jane
L.1.4.B

Advance Preparation



  • Prepare the following sentences to display in the classroom:

    • Each night I reread the story Me… Jane.

    • My mother wants to redo the kitchen.

    • I had to reheat my food because it was cold.




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT use frequently used affixes (the prefix re-) as a clue to the meaning of a word.

  2. Display and read the prepared sentences,

  3. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Organize pairs. Say: Tell what you notice about the underlined words. (They start with the same two letters.)

  4. Say: Re- is a prefix that is sometimes added to the beginning of words. Adding this changes the meaning of the word.

  5. Have students repeat the word reread. Model clapping to represent two syllables in the underlined words. Ask students to tell what part is left after the re- is taken away. Repeat the process for redo and reheat.

  6. Experiment with placing different verbs into sentences with and without the prefix re-. (make, tell, play) Examples:


    • I make the bed every day./I had to remake the bed after my dog jumped on it.

    • I tell my mom about my day after school./I had to retell my mom about my day because she couldn’t hear me with all the thunder.

    • I play music when I study./I replay the songs I like.


  7. Say: The prefix re- means again..


Check Vocabulary Skills



  1. Have students complete sentence frames by using either the root word or the word that is formed when the prefix re- is added.

  2. Have students consider whether draw or redraw would best complete this sentence frame: The boy will ________ his picture because it did not have enough details the first time.


Reteach



  • Ask: What does the word draw mean? (to sketch something) What does redraw mean? (to draw something again) Is the boy drawing something for the first time or the second time? (the second time) Which word best complete the sentence? (redraw)


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students write a sentence that includes a word with the prefix re- .

    Sample Student Response:


    I want to replay the movie because I enjoyed it so much. 




Reteach



  • Discuss the difference between read and reread with students. Say: Read means look at words and pictures to understand the text. Let’s read the book about Jane Goodall. It’s a book I like to read, so now I’ll reread it.


What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?
L.1.5.B

Advance Preparation



  • Prepare the following chart for display:


 


LV G1 Mod 1

 
AnimalAttribute #1Attribute #2

Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE:SWBAT define at least two attributes of different animals.

  2. Display the chart from ADVANCE PREPARATION.

  3. Explain to students that today they will use What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? to identify animals and their attributes, or features.

  4. Display p. 4, and have students open to that page in What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?

  5. Point to the illustration of the hyena. Write “hyena” under Animal in the chart. Explain that each animal has attributes, or features, that make it unique.

  6. Draw students’ attention to the hyena’s four legs. Say: The hyena has four legs. This is an attribute of the hyena. Write “four legs” under Attribute #1. Draw students’ attention to the hyena’s whiskers. Say: The hyena also has whiskers. Write “whiskers” under Attribute #2.

  7. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Have students talk about the elephant on pp. 4–5 and two of its attributes. Write student responses on the chart.


 


LV G1 Mod 1 tab2

 
AnimalAttribute #1Attribute #2
hyenafour legswhiskers
elephanttrunkwhiskers


  • Have students identify another animal on pp. 4–5. Ask them to write the animal’s name and draw two of its attributes.


Reteach



  1. Remind students that attributes, or features, can be parts of the animal.

  2. Ask: Which animal did you draw? What are the two attributes of the animal?


 Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students look through the book and choose another animal. Ask them to write the animal’s name and draw two of its attributes.


Reteach



  1. Point out that attributes can help the students define and identify animals.

  2. Ask: What parts of the animal can you draw to define the animal?

Never Smile at a Monkey
L.1.5.D

Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT identify different, more descriptive ways to say “touch.”

  2. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Have students share what they already know about the word touch and how it can be used. Then have them use the word in familiar contexts (e.g., “Don’t touch the stove when it’s hot”; “I want to touch the soft kitten”).

  3. Explain that students can use words that mean the same or almost the same as touch but are more descriptive. Say: For example, feel is another word that can be used instead of touch.

  4. Have students turn to p. 3 in Never Smile at a Monkey. Read aloud, “Never pet a platypus.” Ask: What does it mean to pet something? (to touch in a gentle way)

  5. Explain that the author uses different and more descriptive words to say touch. The writing also wouldn’t be as interesting for readers if the same word were used over and over again.

  6. Have student pairs skim the Never sentences on pp. 7–26 of Never Smile at a Monkey to find three words that mean the same or almost the same as touch. Pairs can keep track of their words on paper to share with the class as time allows.


Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Circulate as students read the Never sentences to monitor their capacity to identify words that mean the same or almost the same as “touch.”


Reteach



  • Remind students to read only the Never sentences and to look for words that mean the same as touch but may be a little different and more descriptive.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students write one word that means touch from pp. 7–26 in Never Smile at a Monkey.


Reteach



  1. Remind students that many of the sentences that begin with the word Never include words that are similar in meaning to the word

  2. Turn to p. 9 of Never Smile at a Monkey. Read aloud the Never sentence. Ask: If you clutch a cane toad, what would you do? Is clutch similar in meaning to touch?

GRADE 1: MODULE 3

GRADE 1: MODULE 3

 
A Weed is a Flower
L.1.4.A

Advance Preparation



  1. Display these sentences from A Weed Is a Flower (p. 16): So, George Washington Carver chose to study agriculture. He learned about plants, flowers, and soil.

  2. Display these sentences from A Weed Is a Flower (pp. 3–4) with a period between them, and omit the ellipses:


Mean men rode silently in the night, kidnapping slaves from their owners and harming those who tried to stop them . . . . But before Mary could hide her baby, the men came and snatched them both, and rode away into the night.


 



  1. For the EXIT TICKET, remove the second sentence by covering it or erasing it.


Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

  2. Share steps. Say: When a word is new or unfamiliar, sometimes we can use other words in the sentence to find its meaning. This is what I do:

    • First, I read the sentence and underline the word or place a sticky note near it.

    • Then I find other words in the sentence that have clues to the meaning of the unknown word.

    • Finally, I try out different meanings to see if they make sense in the sentence.





  1. Display the sentences from Advance Preparation: So, George Washington Carver chose to study agriculture. He learned about plants, flowers, and soil. Then use them to model the steps for using sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word:

    • Say: I do not know what the word agriculture

    • Underline the word agriculture and say: I’ll look for other words in the sentence or next sentence that might be clues to the meaning of this word.

    • The words plants, flowers, and soil seem like examples of what Carver learned. If he studied agriculture and learned about these examples, agriculture has something to do with plants and soil.

    • Let’s see if that makes sense in the sentence. Replace the word agriculture with the words plants and soil. Then, say: So, George Washington Carver chose to study plants and soil. I think it does make sense.

    • The word agriculture has something to do with plants and soil.




Check Vocabulary Skills



  1. Read aloud the displayed excerpt from A Weed Is a Flower: “Mean men rode silently in the night, kidnapping slaves from their owners and harming those who tried to stop them. But before Mary could hide her baby, the men came and snatched them both, and rode away into the night.”

  2. Ask: What does the word kidnapping mean? What words help you understand the meaning of kidnapping? Listen to the sentences again.

  3. Students may struggle with identifying context clues in surrounding sentences.


Reteach



  • Ask: What happens to George? (He is snatched and taken away into the night.) How does this help you understand the meaning of kidnapping? (I think kidnapping means to take someone.)


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students answer the selected-response question. (Only the second sentence of the second excerpt should be displayed.)


Which words in this sentence from A Weed Is a Flower help you understand the meaning of the word slaves? “Mean men rode silently in the night, kidnapping slaves from their owners and harming those who tried to stop them.”


A.  in the night


B.  their owners


C.  stop them


Sample Student Response: B. their owners



Reteach



  • Ask: Where should you look for clues to a word’s meaning? (in the words around it) Which words help you understand the meaning of the word slaves—in the night or their owners?

Seven Blind Mice
L.1.5.C

Materials



  • Whiteboards (one per student)


Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT identify real-life connections between the word sturdy and its use.

  2. Display the image of a pillar on p. 5 of Seven Blind Mice. Point to the pillar and say: This object is called a pillar. What can you tell about this pillar? (It is very tall and wide. It is much, much bigger than mice) Ask: Do you think a pillar is weak or strong? Why? (A pillar is probably strong because it looks so tall and wide.)

  3. Read the first three lines from Seven Blind Mice and then say: White Mouse thinks the Something is “as sturdy as a pillar.” What do you think the word sturdy means? (strong, solid, hard, tall, wide)

  4. Explain that the word sturdy means strong or solid.

  5. PARTNERS: Organize pairs to brainstorm some other things that are sturdy like a pillar. (a tree, an elephant’s legs, a football player)

  6. Reconvene and invite partners to share.


Check Vocabulary Skills



  1. Distribute whiteboards.

  2. Have students complete this sentence frame on their whiteboards: A __________ is sturdy like a pillar.


Reteach



  • Review that pillar refers to something that is strong or solid. Complete the sentence frame with an example: A brick is sturdy like a pillar.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students answer the selected-response question:


Which of these things is sturdy like a pillar?


A.  a snake


B.  a tree


C.  a rope


Sample Student Response: B. a tree



Reteach



  • Review that sturdy means “strong” or “solid.” Refer back to the image of a pillar.

Testing the ice: A True Story About Jackie Robinson
L.1.5.D

Advance Preparation



  • Display

    • these words: happy, excited, thrilled

    • this sentence frame: The __________ children cheered.




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT distinguish among the intensity of adjectives by choosing them in cloze sentences.

  2. Briefly review that adjectives are words that tell more about nouns.

  3. Recall that when Jackie Robinson returned after checking the ice, the children felt so glad they skated circles around him and cheered. They called him “the bravest man alive.” Explain that glad describes the children’s feelings, but other words can also be used.

  4. Refer to and read the displayed adjectives: happy, excited, and

  5. Say: These are other adjectives that have almost the same meaning as glad and can describe a good feeling.

  6. Explain that the adjective happy is just a little stronger than glad. Say: The adjectives excited and thrilled get stronger in meaning.

  7. Briefly define the words:

    • happy: a good feeling

    • excited: a very good feeling

    • thrilled: a very happy and excited feeling





  1. Say: I can use these different words to show how strong my feelings are. When the sun came out after an hour of rain, I might use happy to describe my feelings. When the sun came out after a day of rain, I might use excited to describe my feelings. When the sun came out after a week of rain, I might use thrilled to describe my feelings.

  2. Refer to and read the displayed sentence: The _________ children cheered.

  3. Ask: What is the best word to describe the children’s feelings when they cheered for their father? (thrilled).



Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Ask students to complete the following sentence with an adjective that describes the boy’s feelings: The __________ boy smiled. (happy)


Reteach



  • Review that some adjectives describe a feeling. Also recall that different words describe feelings of different strengths, such as happy, excited, and thrilled. Ask: Which word describes a very good feeling? (excited)


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Point to the three displayed words and read them aloud again. Have students write the word that means glad in the sentence: The __________ puppy ran around the room.
    Sample Student Responses: excited


Reteach



  • Review definitions for happy, excited, thrilled.

GRADE 1: MODULE 4

GRADE 1: MODULE 4

 
Storms
L.1.4.A

Materials



  • Storms (pp. 12–13, 22, 30, displayed)


Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT use context clues to determine the meaning of the word funnel in Storms.

  2. Say: Sometimes, when you read, you come across a hard word or a word you don’t know. If that happens, you can use context clues, or the words and pictures around that word, to help you figure out the meaning of the word.

  3. Share and model the steps for using context clues to determine the meaning of the word hailstones in Storms:


    • Read until you reach a word you do not know. Display and read aloud pp. 12–13 of Storms. Say: I’m not sure I understand the meaning of the word What can I do to figure out its meaning?

    • Find clues to the word’s meaning in the surrounding text. Say: I can ask myself, “What clues are there in the text about the meaning of this word?” The words “not stones” and ice are clues to the meaning of the word

    • Clues can also be found in the surrounding images. Say: I can also look at the picture. Point to the images of the hand holding a large chunk of ice and the balls of ice on the ground. The hand in the picture is holding a hailstone. It looks like ice that comes out of our freezer at home.

    • Define the unknown word using the clues. Say:Using the context clues from the text and pictures, I can figure out the meaning of hailstones. The word hailstones means “stones made of ice.”



  4. Read aloud p. 22 and have pairs work together to determine the meaning of the word (the middle of a hurricane in which winds are calm) Elicit responses from several volunteers. 


Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Reread p. 30 of Storms. Have students use context clues to determine the meaning of the word Ask: What does the word huddle mean? (to move close together or push in against one another when sharing something such as heat)


Reteach



  • Say: Look for clues in the text and in the picture that will help you understand the meaning of the word huddle. What clues do you see? (I see the word togethe The picture shows the bison standing close together.) Using these clues, what do you think the word huddle means? (to move close together)


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students write the context clue that helped them define the word funnel on p. 15.                                                                                      Sample Student Response:                                               

    • It is described as being cone-shaped.




Reteach



  • Review that context clues can be found in the text around the word and in images that relate to the word.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
L.1.4.A

Materials



  • The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (pp. 7–8, 10, 11–12, displayed)


Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT use sentence-level context clues to determine the meaning of challenging words in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.

  2. You can use context clues to help determine the meaning of challenging words that you come across while reading. Sometimes you can find context clues in the words and pictures that are around or near the word you do not understand.

  3. Share and model the steps for using context clues to determine the meaning of the word scorched in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind:

    • Display and read aloud pp. 7–8 of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. Say: I’m not sure I understand the meaning of the word scorched. I can use context clues to figure out its meaning.

    • Say: I can ask myself, “What clues are there in the text about the meaning of this word?” The words before and after scorched provide clues. I learn from these words that there is no water because it hasn’t rained. The words also say that the sun is angry and turns the maize into dust, or dries up the maize.

    • Say: I can also look at the picture. Point to the image of the sun, and say: The sun is red, which makes it look very hot. What happens if you touch something that is very hot? You get burned.



  4. Say:Using the context clues from the words and the picture, I can figure out the meaning of scorched. It means “to be dried out with heat.” In other words, the sun dried out the fields with its heat.


Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Monitor students’ capacity to use sentence-level context clues to determine the meaning of the word sulked on p. 10 of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.


Reteach



  • Display and read aloud p. 10 of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. Say: The word sulked is a hard word. Let’s use context clues to figure out its meaning. The words that come before say that William had to quit school and that he watched the other kids go to school while he stood alone feeling hungry. The picture shows William sitting under a mango tree with a sad look on his face. Using these clues, we can figure out that the word sulked means that William “pouted or felt sorry for himself.”


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Write context clues that help you figure out the meaning of the word blades on p. 11.                                                                                                Sample Student Responses:   

    • “like a fan”

    • the pictures of the windmills




Reteach



  • Read pp. 11–12 aloud. Ask: What words before and after the word blades provide clues about the meaning of blades? What context clues do the illustrations on pp. 11–12 provide?

Storms
L.1.5.C

Materials



Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT match real-life storm experiences with details from Storms.

  2. WHIP-AROUND: Ask students to name all the types of storms they have seen, heard, or read. Make a list on chart paper. (lightning storms, tornados, hurricanes, twisters, cyclones, snow storms, blizzards, monsoons, sandstorms, hailstorms, typhoons)

  3. Explain that informational texts can sometimes discuss topics that students know about from their real lives and that using their real-life experiences can help them better understand what they read.

  4. Share and model the steps for matching real-life storm experiences with details from Storms, using pp. 12–13.

    • Read the text aloud. Say: I will read pp. 12–13 about hailstorms.

    • Define an unfamiliar word using details from the text. Say: These pages are about hailstorms. A hailstorm is a type of thunderstorm that makes ice instead of rain.

    • Connect the word to a real-life experience. Say: One summer, during a thunderstorm, big balls started falling from the sky. I touched one ball that landed on a leaf and it felt cold. We were having a hailstorm.

    • Study a photograph of a real-life storm and write a caption for it using your knowledge of the word. Say: These photographs on pp. 12–13 show a hailstorm. I will write a caption for the page: Hailstones covered the ground after the hailstorm.




Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Circulate as students read to monitor their capacity to match real-life storm experiences with details from Storms.


Reteach



  • Read p. 14 of Storms. Point out and define the word Display the photograph of a tornado. Have students write a caption for the picture using the word tornado correctly.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students draw a picture on their whiteboards showing one detail from a real-life storm incident they experienced.                                       Sample Student Responses:

    • a drawing of themselves in a snowstorm

    • a drawing of them playing in a rain puddle after a rain storm

    • a drawing of them in a storm cellar during a tornado




Reteach



  • Read p. 10 of Storms. Ask students if they have ever seen lightning. Ask them if the lightning they experienced made loops and patterns.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
(http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/158/the-wonderful-wizard-of-oz/2747/chapter-1-the-cyclone/)

L.1.5.C

Materials



  1. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (displayed: http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/158/the-wonderful-wizard-of-oz/2747/chapter-1-the-cyclone/)

  2. Tier 2 words and definitions from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (for your reference)

    • stern: (p. 2) firm and determined; not flexible

    • solemn: (p. 2) serious in appearance, sound, or mood

    • anxiously: (p. 2) feeling worried, nervous, or afraid about something

    • frightened: (p. 2) seized with fear




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT connect emotions from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz with real-life experiences.

  2. Explain that today students will learn new words that will help them define the emotions they experience.

  3. Say: We will focus on words in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz that describe emotions: stern, solemn, fright, lonely, and worry.

  4. Recall the definitions for stern, solemn, anxiously, and frightened.

  5. Read the sentences from the text that contain each word (Use Control or Command + F to easily find the words in the displayed web page.). Then say: Uncle Henry looked stern and solemn, and he rarely spoke. When Dorothy felt frightened, she was afraid. She looked anxiously at the sky because the gray color made her worry. Anxious means “worried”.

  6. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Have students think about times when they felt stern, solemn, anxious, or frightened. Have students share their thoughts using the sentence, “I am _________ when __________.” For example, “I am frightened when I hear noises at night.”


Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Circulate as students think-pair-share to monitor their capacity to connect the emotion words with their own experiences. Students may struggle to think of experiences to connect to the words.


Reteach



  • Give students examples from your own experience. For example, say: I am lonely when my family is out of town. I am stern when my dog is disobedient. I am solemn when I visit someone in the hospital. I am anxious before a hurricane.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Have students use words from the lesson to complete this sentence frame: “I am __________ when __________.”                                         Sample Student Responses:

    • I am anxious when I miss the bus.

    • I am frightened when the nightlight goes out.

    • I am stern when my little sister bugs me.




Reteach



  • Recall the definitions for each word in the Tier 2 list. Use the words to ask students to recall their real-life experiences. For example, ask: When is a time you felt anxious, meaning “worried?

GRADE 1: MODULE 5

GRADE 1: MODULE 5

 
Cinderella
L.1.4.A

Advance Preparation



  • Display these sentences from Cinderella and read them aloud when directed:

    • It was Cinderella who scoured the pots and scrubbed the stairs.

    • The young prince conducted her to the seat of greatest honor and then led her out on the floor to dance.

    • Cinderella asked them to rise, embraced them and told them she forgave them with all her heart.




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT use sentence-level context clues to determine the meaning of verbs ending in –ed.

  2. Explain that when the ending –ed is added to the end of a verb, it means that the action has already happened. Emphasize that the action of the verb does not change, just when that action happened.

  3. Display and read aloud the first prepared sentence from Cinderella: It was Cinderella who scoured the pots and scrubbed the stairs.

  4. Think aloud about clues in the text that help you understand the meaning of the word scoured.

    • Underline the word scoured.

    • Say: Let’s find clues in the sentence to figure out what the verb scoured means. It says Cinderella “scoured the pots,” so I know this word has something to do with pots. She could have put them away, or cooked with them, or bought them, or cleaned them. In the sentence it says she also “scrubbed the stairs.” I know that means she cleaned the stairs, so it would make sense if she also cleaned the pots.

    • Say: I also notice that this word ends in –ed. If I remove the –ed from scoured, I’m left with scour. Cross out the –ed. Say: Now the word is scour. I think the word scour means “to clean.” Let’s remember to add the ending –ed to clean and substitute it for the word scoured in the sentence.

    • Cross out scoured and replace it with cleaned. Read the new sentence aloud: It was Cinderella who cleaned the pots and scrubbed the stairs.

    • Ask: Does the sentence still make sense. (yes) Say: I think scoured means the same thing as





  1. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Pair students. Read aloud the second displayed sentence from Cinderella: The young prince conducted her to the seat of greatest honor and then led her out on the floor to dance. Instruct students to use sentence context clues to figure out the meaning of conducted.

  2. Invite volunteers to share definitions for conducted and the context clues they used to figure out its meaning. (The word conducted means “guided or led.” Later, the sentence says the prince led Cinderella to the dance floor. I can replace the word conducted with led.)


Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Reference and again read aloud the second displayed sentence: The young prince conducted her to the seat of greatest honor and then led her out on the floor to dance. Circulate as students THINK-PAIR-SHARE to monitor their capacity to use context clues to determine the meaning of the verb conducted.


 Reteach



  • Say: The second part of the sentence says that the prince led Cinderella to the dance floor. Let’s see if the word led makes sense in the first part of the sentence: The young prince led her to the seat of greatest honor. Yes, it does. Can you think of any other words that might make sense? (guided)


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Reference and read aloud the third displayed sentence: Cinderella asked them to rise, embraced them and told them she forgave them with all her heart. Ask students to use sentence clues to figure out the meaning of the word embraced. Then, have them answer the selected-response question.


What is the meaning of the word embraced?


A.  Hugged


B.  Bumped


C.  Insulted


 


Sample Student Response:


A.  Hugged



Reteach



  • Say: Let’s look for clues in the sentence to the meaning of embraced. I see a clue. The words say that “she forgave them with all her heart.” I think after the sisters stood up, she gave them a hug to show that she forgave them. I think the word embraced means “hugged.”

The Korean Cinderella
L.1.4.C

Advance Preparation



  1. Create word cards for these words: named, naming; rested, resting. (one per student)

  2. Display and read aloud these sentences when directed:

    • The girl, named Peony, was just the age of Pear Blossom. (The Korean Cinderella, 5)

    • When Omoni and Peony returned, they found Pear Blossom resting beside the jar. (The Korean Cinderella, 15)

    • I heard my sister in her room ________ her new doll Janna! That’s my name, Janna Franks.

    • We _______ after playing hard at the park. Now we are ready to play some more.

    • She is so tired that she is _________ again.




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT combine understanding of a root work and the affixes –ing and –ed to choose the correct verb to complete sentences.

  2. If necessary, review the definition and function of a verb, which is to tell actions.

  3. Recall that verbs that end in –ing are in the present tense and that verbs that end in –ed are usually in the past tense.

  4. Explain that readers can look at the root or base word to figure out the meaning of new words. They can combine this meaning with the meaning of the endings –ing and –ed to figure out what the new words mean.

  5. Read aloud these sentences from The Korean Cinderella:

    • The girl, named Peony, was just the age of Pear Blossom. (p. 5)

    • When Omoni and Peony returned, they found Pear Blossom resting beside the jar. (p. 15)





  1. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Ask students to identify the base word and ending for each underlined word (name; –ed; rest, –ing.) Then, ask: Based on the letters at the end of the word and the meaning of the base word, what do you think each word means? (named: to have the name or be called; resting: to be quiet and not busy or working)

  2. Distribute the word cards. Then read aloud the displayed sentences and answer choices. Ask students to hold up the word card that completes each sentence. Then have them identify the based word and affix.

    • I heard my sister in her room ________ (named, naming; name + –ing) her new doll Janna! That’s my name, Janna Franks.

    • We _______ (rested, resting; rest + –ed) after playing hard at the park. Now we are ready to play some more.




Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Circulate to monitor students capacity to choose the verb that completes the sentence and identify its parts. Students may struggle to choose the word with the correct affix or to recognize the root word, especially with name where there is a spelling change.


Reteach



  • Review that sometimes we have to change the spelling of a word to add an ending. Clarify that naming comes from name and –ed but we drop the last e in name. Then remind students to think of the meaning of the base word before adding the meaning of –ed or –ing.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Read aloud the final displayed sentence: She is so tired that she is _________ again. Have students hold up the word card that correctly completes the sentence and then identify the base word and affix.                                                                                                               Sample Student Response: resting; rest + –ing


Reteach



  • Ask:

    • Does the action happen now or in the past? Point out the word is, which appears twice. Explain that it usually means an action is happening in the present.

    • Which word ends in letters that show that something happened in the past? (resting)

    • What word do you get if you take away the ending? (rest)



Cinderella
L.1.5.D

Materials



  • Display these grouped words:

    • whisper, speak, shout

    • walk, creep, sprint, scamper, run

    • gulp, sip, drink

    • cry, bawl, whimper




Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: WBAT distinguish shades of meaning in verbs describing movement, such as creep and scampered, by creating a word line.

  2. Recall that verbs are action words and explain that some verbs have similar meanings. Even though these words are similar, each word has its own special meaning. Sometimes the difference is how strong the word’s meaning is.

  3. Refer to the first group of displayed words: whisper, speak, shout. Read the words aloud. Use your voice to show what the words mean. Say: These words all describe ways of talking, but have slightly different meanings. Whisper means “to talk softly;” speak means “to talk in a normal voice;” and shout means “to talk in a loud voice.” Each word has a stronger meaning.

  4. Write the words using a word line (whisper → speak → shout). Explain that a word line shows the words from weakest to strongest.

  5. Refer to the second group of displayed words: walk, creep, sprint, scamper, run. As you model the steps, create another word line on the board (creep → walk → scamper→ run → sprint):

    • First, define each word: Point to each word and define it in your own words. Say: The first word is walk, which means someone is moving at a regular speed. Creep is what people do when they are sneaking by. They move very slowly. Next, I see the word sprint, which means “to move very fast.” Someone who is sprinting while running is running as fast as he or she can. Scamper is a playful type of run. The word run means “to go fast.”

    • Next, set up the word line. Say: On a word line, the two words with the most opposite meanings are put on either end of the word line. In our example, the words creep and sprint have the most opposite meaning. I will write creep on one end and sprint on the other. We will order the words from slowest to fastest.

    • Next, put the words in order: Say: Creep is the word that describes the slowest type of movement. I will draw an arrow after creep. What comes next? Run and sprint are the fastest types of movement. They will not go next. This leaves two words—scamper and walk. Scamper is a playful run, which is faster than walking, so after creep the next slowest is walk. Write walk next and put an arrow after it followed by scamper. Say: A sprint is a very fast run, so that will come last. This means run must come next. Write run next, followed by an arrow and then




Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Refer to the third group of displayed words: gulp, sip, and drink. Tell students to create a word line with these verbs, arranging them in order of their strength. Suggest that they think about how much water a person gets for each verb. 


Reteach



  • Write sip → drink → gulp on the board. Explain that sip means to drink a little bit at a time, drink means to take liquid in your mouth, and gulp means to take large swallows of something.


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Refer to the fourth group of displayed words: cry, bawl, whimper. On paper, have students create a word line, ordering the words according to strength.


Reteach



  • Explain that these words have slightly different meanings. Demonstrate that whimper means “to cry softly,” sob means “to cry noisily,” and bawl means “to cry really loudly”. Create the word line on the board: whimper → sob → bawl.

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters
L.1.5.D

Materials and Advance Preparation



  1. When directed, display and read aloud these sentences, words, and phrases.

    • Manyara ignored the man with his head tucked under his arm.

      • talked to, overlooked, chose, passed by, noticed. (Display below ignore.)



    • Everyone bustled about, searching and calling for her. (Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters, p. 15)

    • Though anxious about her sister, Nyasha was soon filled with excitement about all there was to see. (Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters, p. 15)

      • happy, worried, angry, sad, concerned





  2. Create words cards for these words (one set per student): hurried, rushed, stood, walked, dragged


Introduce the Vocabulary Learning Objective



  1. LEARNING OBJECTIVE: SWBAT identify synonyms to determine the meaning of bustle.

  2. If necessary, review that a synonym is a word that has the same or almost the same meaning as another word.

  3. Recall that students have discussed the shades of meanings of verbs in previous modules and lessons. Say: Readers often use synonyms to help determine the meaning of unknown words. Finding words that are synonyms helps readers group words together based on their meanings. This is a way to determine the shades of meanings of verbs.

  4. Reference and read aloud the first displayed sentence with ignored: Manyara ignored the man with his head tucked under his arm.

  5. Read aloud the words displayed with ignore: talked to, overlooked, chose, passed by, noticed.

  6. THINK-PAIR-SHARE: Ask: Which words mean the same or almost the same as the word ignored? Recommend that students try to replace the original word with each word on the board to see if the sentence still makes sense. After students share, confirm that overlooked and passed by are similar to the word ignored.

  7. Reference and read aloud the second sentence with bustled from p. 15 of Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: Everyone bustled about, searching and calling for her. Say: Remember, at this point in the story, everyone is racing around trying to find Manyara.

  8. Distribute word cards for hurried, rushed, stood, walked, dragged. Direct students to read the words on the cards and select the words that are synonyms for the word bustled.

  9. Direct students to hold up one card that defines bustled (hurried, rushed).

  10. Ask students for the definition of bustled. Have them write the definition in a word journal.


 Check Vocabulary Skills



  • Circulate as students read, and monitor their capacity to select word cards that mean the same as the word bustled. Students may struggle to identify the right word cards.


 Reteach



  • Reread aloud the second displayed sentence from p. 15 in Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: Everyone bustled about, searching and calling for her. Say: Remember that at this point in the story, everyone is racing around trying to find Manyara. What are other words that mean “to race around”?


Vocabulary Exit Ticket



  • Reference the third displayed sentence and the words below it. Then read aloud the sentence: Though anxious about her sister, Nyasha was soon filled with excitement about all there was to see. Have students choose the words that are synonyms for anxious and write them.          Sample Student Responses: worried, concerned


Reteach



  • Say: Remember that we are looking for words that mean the same thing as anxious. If Manyara is missing, how would Nayasha feel when she thinks about her? What do you think anxious means?